N.J. proposes diverting $20M in Sandy funds to improve Atlantic City infrastructure

Foundations and pilings are all that remain of brick buildings and a boardwalk in Atlantic City, N.J., Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012, after they were destroyed when a powerful storm that started out as Hurricane Sandy made landfall on the East Coast on Monday night. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)

Foundations and pilings are all that remain of brick buildings and a boardwalk in Atlantic City, N.J., Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012, after they were destroyed when a powerful storm that started out as Hurricane Sandy made landfall on the East Coast on Monday night. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)

The New Jersey Department of Community Affairs is proposing a transfer of $20 million in federal funding to repair and replace Atlantic City infrastructure and public facilities damaged by Superstorm Sandy, officials announced.

Gov. Phil Murphy’s administration identified funding through the newly announced Atlantic City Resilience Program for the repair, replacement, or construction of bulkheads, flood mitigation — including flood-proofing City Hall and other public buildings — and the inspection and replacement of check valves in drainage areas.

In a statement, Murphy said “there is still much to be done” in improving Atlantic City’s infrastructure.

“As climate change turns previously once-in-a-lifetime catastrophes like Superstorm Sandy into more frequent occurrences, it is clear that we cannot wait to respond to these disasters after the fact, and that our efforts must continue,” he said.

Lt. Governor Sheila Oliver, also the Department of Community Affairs commissioner, added that the transfer of $20 million in Community Development Block Grant Disaster Recovery funding will protect more than $100 million already spent in restoring homes and rebuilding small businesses damaged by the storm.

“Also, in the longer-term, these projects will help guard against repetitive flooding and fortify Atlantic City to attract future investment,” she said.

The administration said the Atlantic City Resilience Program would be a joint effort between the state and the city, adding that the state will ensure that projects are done by the end of 2022 and the funding transfer would not impact any existing federal disaster funding.

As of April, when Murphy announced millions of funds would be made available for New Jersey Superstorm Sandy victims still not home, more than 1,000 homeowners remained displaced.

The public can review the proposal here and submit comments to sandy.publiccomment@dca.nj.gov by Dec. 18.

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