Mosquito population to boom following wet winter

    The last 12 months have been the wettest on record in New Jersey. All the rain and snow melt could result in a lot more mosquitoes than usual for the region.
    Get ready. Mosquitoes are expected to start showing up in much of the region in about a week. Peter Bosak is superintendent of the Department of Mosquito Control in Cape May County.

    The last 12 months have been the wettest on record in New Jersey. All the rain and snow melt could result in a lot more mosquitoes than usual for the region.

    Get ready. Mosquitoes are expected to start showing up in much of the region in about a week.  Peter Bosak is superintendent of the Department of Mosquito Control in Cape May County.

    Bosak: We actually have a group of early spring mosquitoes and of course now with the increased amount of water we have found a fair amount of mosquito larvae and if the weather warms up those larvae are going to emerge as adults and potentially could cause some real nuisance problems.

    Bosak says the early crop of mosquitoes are not the ones that transmit West Nile and other diseases but they can be annoying. To limit their number, mosquito control teams are removing standing water from areas where mosquitoes breed. They’ll soon also be putting out mosquito eating fish and bio-control pesticides.

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