Judge orders Lower Merion to save evidence in Laptop-spying case

    A federal judge ordered Lower Merion School District to preserve any electronic evidence related to charges that school administrators spied on students at home using school-issued laptops. But a lawyer for the student who sued the district says the order does not go far enough.

    A federal judge ordered Lower Merion School District to preserve any electronic evidence related to charges that school administrators spied on students at home using school-issued laptops. But a lawyer for the student who sued the district says the order does not go far enough.

    Outside the federal courthouse in downtown Philadelphia, attorney Mark Haltzman said the lawsuit stemmed from accusations by school officials that his client, a student at Harriton High School, was dealing drugs. A school official told parents they had pictures taken through the computer’s webcam while the student was at home, and they appeared to show him handling pills.

    Mark Haltzman: They were actually Mike and Ikes, and the assistant principal approached him and his parents about that and made allegations that they thought he was selling drugs.

    Haltzman says he wants his forensic experts to be able to dig deeper into the school’s computer system for evidence, but for now, that’s not allowed.

    Haltzman did secure an order from the judge that prevents the school district from contacting students and parents about the case, unless Haltzman gives his consent.

    In an unusual move, the U.S. Attorney’s office has confirmed that they have launched an investigation with the FBI and the Montgomery County District Attorney’s office.

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