Francisville: Eco-friendly restaurant now open

This article was created in partnership with Philadelphia Neighborhoods, Temple University’s capstone multimedia journalism class.

By Matthew Pitts
For PlanPhilly

Restaurants highlight a community’s growth. The problem is that opening one takes time. Fare Restaurant, located at 2028 Fairmount Ave., has been in the process since May 2009.

Not only do they have the regular troubles of opening, but the owners also have an objective with the place. Their mission is to bring the greenest restaurant possible to the area. While other restaurants in the area serve bar food and cold beer, Fare will showcase organic and healthy food. This makes them the odd duck in the bunch.

The neighborhood has become greener with neighborhood cleanups and newly planted trees. It is hard for businesses to know how the community will receive them.
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However, Robert Amar, general manager of Fare, does not seem troubled.

“Did we believe that this neighborhood could sustain something that was a little bit more sophisticated… a little finer?” Amar asked, “We knew that it would.”

The food is trying to be as healthy as possible, which for them means organic. There is no deep fryer found in their kitchen. While they do have a burger, the usual side of fries will not appear on the plate. “If you want to get a burger and fries, there are lots of places to get that very good burger and fries,” Amar said.

Other places can do a burger, but Fare is reaching just outside the normal boundaries for the area. The burger on the menu is topped with spinach, feta and yogurt, instead of the usual American cheese and bacon. The menu is both meat-lover and vegetarian friendly.

Fare aspires to be more than just a local pub. For instance, Fare’s bar is different than the others. It is a wine bar. Because of their green perspective, their wine, beer and spirits will be organic or sustainable. Because of their green perspective, they will offer organic or sustainable options for their wine, beer and spirits too.

Some people may not give the restaurant a chance because the words green and organic can mean tasteless and expensive. David Orphanides, co-owner of Fare, understands some people’s hesitation with his place.

“The reality is the preconception some people have regarding things that are green or organic or a space that serves that type of food,” Orphanides said.

The owners are hopeful because even the idea of opening a restaurant was a dream not so long ago. But they have made it a reality through hard work. Their dream opened to the public on May 31.

Contact the reporter at m.pitts@temple.edu

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