Fewer Americans worried about climate change now than in 1989

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     In this March 19, 2015, file photo, President Barack Obama, flanked by senior adviser Brian Deese, left, and Christina Goldfuss, managing director of the Council on Environmental Quality, speaks at Energy Department in Washington. The president pledged to cut United States greenhouse gas emissions by up to 28 percent. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

    In this March 19, 2015, file photo, President Barack Obama, flanked by senior adviser Brian Deese, left, and Christina Goldfuss, managing director of the Council on Environmental Quality, speaks at Energy Department in Washington. The president pledged to cut United States greenhouse gas emissions by up to 28 percent. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

    President Barack Obama recently called for major reductions in greenhouse gas emissions. New Gallup data show that Americans’ worries about global warming are actually no higher now than in 1989, although there is general sympathy with the effort to reduce our reliance on coal and, in turn, support for the idea of increasing reliance on wind and solar.

    A slight majority continue to approve the use of nuclear power, but support is more tepid than it has been. New analysis shows how much. Even within political party, there are further big differences by ideology. In some ways, conservative Republicans stand out from everyone else.

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