Feibush puts $250,000 into Philly Council race

     Developer Ori Feibush is challenging incumbent Councilman Kenyatta Johnson in the 2nd Council District in South and Southwest Philadelphia.

    Developer Ori Feibush is challenging incumbent Councilman Kenyatta Johnson in the 2nd Council District in South and Southwest Philadelphia.

    Philadelphia developer Ori Feibush has put at least $250,000 of his own cash into his City Council campaign, a move which will double the campaign contribution limits for other candidates.

    Feibush is challenging incumbent Kenyatta Johnson in the 2nd Council District in South and Southwest Philadelphia. The city’s campaign finance law limits individual contributions to candidates to $2,900 and political committee donations to $11,500.

    Feibush’s move triggers the “millionaire’s provision” of the law, raising those limits to $5,800 for individuals and $23,000 for political committees. The higher limits apply only for the race for that district.

    Feibush told me he’s investing heavily because he’s serious about winning.

    “This is a desire to go all in, to show everyone that I’m 100 percent serious about being the councilman of the 2nd District,” Feibush said. “I’m also fully aware that in no world does money buy an election in Philadelphia. This is simply a tool to help get a very important message out there.”

    Feibush won’t say exactly how much he’s invested, and he won’t have to until a campaign finance report is filed April 7.

    Johnson’s campaign strategist, Mark Nevins, said it’s not surprising Feibush is in for big money, adding, “We will use every available  resource to make sure we  can compete with Ori’s wealth.”

    You may recall that in 2007 mayoral candidate Tom Knox triggered the millionaire’s provision by self-funding his campaign. But this isn’t the first time a City Council candidate has crossed the $250,000 threshold. Businessman Howard Treatman spent more than that to finance his unsuccessful effort to win the 8th Council District seat in Northwest Philadelphia.

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