Remembering Justice Thurgood Marshall, 50 years after his Supreme Court confirmation

    Listen
     This Aug. 22, 1958 file photo shows Thurgood Marshall outside the Supreme Court in Washington.  Marshall, the head of the NAACP's legal arm who argued part of the case, went on to become the Supreme Court's first African-American justice in 1967. (AP Photo, File)

    This Aug. 22, 1958 file photo shows Thurgood Marshall outside the Supreme Court in Washington. Marshall, the head of the NAACP's legal arm who argued part of the case, went on to become the Supreme Court's first African-American justice in 1967. (AP Photo, File)

    Ugonna Eze, the National Constitution Center’s Fellow for Constitutional Studies, discussed Marshall’s tenure on the court, his legacy and influence on today’s court with WHYY’s Dave Heller.

    Fifty years ago today, the U.S. Senate confirmed Thurgood Marshall as the first African American to serve as a U.S. Supreme Court justice.

    Ugonna Eze, the National Constitution Center’s Fellow for Constitutional Studies, discussed Marshall’s tenure on the court, his legacy, and influence on today’s court with NewsWorks Tonight host Dave Heller.

    Want a digest of WHYY’s programs, events & stories? Sign up for our weekly newsletter.

    Together we can reach 100% of WHYY’s fiscal year goal