Mass shootings and the conversation around mental health

Listen 49:28
A woman cries as she bows her head in prayer during a vigil at the Parkland Baptist Church, for the victims of the Wednesday shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, Fla., Thursday, Feb. 15, 2018. Nikolas Cruz, a former student, was charged with 17 counts of premeditated murder on Thursday. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)

A woman cries as she bows her head in prayer during a vigil at the Parkland Baptist Church, for the victims of the Wednesday shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, Fla., Thursday, Feb. 15, 2018. Nikolas Cruz, a former student, was charged with 17 counts of premeditated murder on Thursday. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)

Guests: Jennifer Mascia, Mark Salzer, Joshua Hazelton

 Wednesday’s school shooting in Florida has reignited many of the same conversations that take place in the aftermath of these all-too-common mass murders. Among them, is the subject of mental health – both of the shooter, and of those affected by witnessing the horrors of watching friends bystanders being murdered. Today, we’ll talk about mental illness as it relates to gun violence with psychologist MARK SALZER, who is the director of the Temple University Collaborative on Community Inclusion of Individuals with Psychiatric Disabilities, and by JOSHUA HAZELTON, director of trauma research and a trauma surgeon at Cooper University. But first, we’ll get the latest information on the shooting when we speak with JENNIFER MASCIA, engagement writer at The Trace who specialize in covering gun violence in America.

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