Yoga competition; fight for the calmest

    Competitive yoga is even making a play to be an official Olympic event.

    Who is the most spiritually balanced among us? Over the weekend hundreds witnessed the regional Yoga championships, which awarded first, second, and third place winners in the activity known for its calm and meditative qualities. Competitive yoga is even making a play to be an official Olympic event.

    Molly Callaghan demonstrates a Full Spine Twist.
    Molly Callaghan demonstrates a Full Spine Twist.

    At the Gershman Y on Broad Street, the thrill of victory and the agony of defeat played out over electronic trance music.

    According to a recent survey by Yoga Journal, 15 million Americans practice the quasi-spiritual fitness regimen, resulting in a industry worth over 5 billion dollars.

    Anna Carapellotti - the 1st place women's winner - demonstrates a Full Cobra pose.
    Anna Carapellotti - the 1st place women's winner - demonstrates a Full Cobra pose.

    But the yogis at the regional championships seemed blissfully unconcerned about material gains. Actor and yoga instructor Chris Fluck says the point is not to beat your competitor but to improve yourself.

    Fluck:It’s nothing like competing in a sport where you want to beat your opponent – like tennis. It drives you to get precise – you have a goal to tighten things up. As a training journey, it’s wonderful.

    Anna Carapellotti - the 1st place women's winner - demonstrates a Crane pose.
    Anna Carapellotti - the 1st place women's winner - demonstrates a Crane pose.

    The winner of the regional championship will go onto the nationals in Los Angeles next month. There is no prize for the winner other than bragging rights – which can be significant if you own your own yoga studio.

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