Specter calls for law to prevent webcam snooping

    Several experts in computer security and cyber law told Specter that there’s a gap in federal law when it comes to internet privacy.

    Privacy advocates say the webcam spying allegations at Lower Merion High School warrant a change in federal law. Sen. Arlen Specter (D-Pa.) held a Senate subcommittee hearing on the issue today in Philadelphia.

    Several experts in computer security and cyber law told Specter that there’s a gap in federal law when it comes to internet privacy.

    “Privacy is a very highly placed American value,” Specter said. “And it’s a violation of federal law to wiretap or to hear oral communications. And I think if you see someone’s image and picture that it ought to have the same privacy protections. And that’s why this hearing has convinced me that federal legislation is warranted and I intend to pursue it.”

    The C.E.O. of Absolute Software, a computer security firm that acquired the software used by Lower Merion School District to track laptops, told Specter that any privacy laws should not apply to those who steal computers.

    He also said the company is no longer using the webcam software utilized by Lower Merion School officials.

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