Spanking and aggressive behavior

    New research published in the journal “Pediatrics” found that kids who were spanked often were twice as likely as those who weren’t spanked to develop aggressive behaviors such as getting into fights, destroying things, or being mean to others.

    New research published in the journal “Pediatrics” found that kids who were spanked often were twice as likely as those who weren’t spanked to develop aggressive behaviors such as getting into fights, destroying things, or being mean to others. WHYY’s Behavioral Health reporter Maiken Scott spoke with psychologist Dan Gottlieb about the findings, and alternatives to spanking.

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