Lower Merion School computer tech invokes 5th Amendment

    The investigation of alleged spying on students through school-issued laptops in the Lower Merion School District has hit a roadblock. The school’s technology coordinator has refused to answer any questions at a deposition. An attorney for the family suing the district says it will tie up the case unnecessarily.

    The investigation of alleged spying on students through school-issued laptops in the Lower Merion School District has hit a roadblock.  The school’s technology coordinator has refused to answer any questions at a deposition.  An attorney for the family suing the district says it will tie up the case unnecessarily.

    The family’s attorney Mark Haltzman, says Carol Cafiero invoked her fifth amendment right against self-incrimination when declining to answer questions at a deposition Friday.

    Haltzman: The Robbins family is extremely concerned as to why this one witness who was at the heart of the ability to control the technology that could spy on students in the home has refused to testify when everyone else has come forward to testify as to what they knew.

    Haltzman calls the move a roadblock in settling the case quickly.

    Cafiero had tried to quash the subpoena. But a federal judge had suggested that she could invoke the fifth amendment when he declined her motion.

    Cafiero has not been indicted or named as a target of any investigation.

    Her attorney, Charles Mandracchia, has said that his client did nothing wrong.

    District officials have acknowledged secretly activating web-cams to find 42 school-issued laptops. I

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