Is ‘Obama Care’ unconstitutional?

    Update: March 22, 2012 — In a mock trial held at the National Constitution Center on Tuesday, the Health Care Reform Law, better known as ‘Obama Care,’ was found to be constitutional. What do you think the Supreme Court will decide next week?

    Update: March 22, 2012 — In a mock trial held at the National Constitution Center on Tuesday, the Health Care Reform Law, better known as ‘Obama Care,’ was found to be constitutional.

    Two Supreme Court litigators argued their cases for and against to a panel of nine judges. By a ratio of 8-1, the judges upheld the law. 

    See highlights on the National Constitution Center website.

    This has no bearing on Health and Human Services vs. Florida, going before the U.S. Supreme Court this month. What do you think the Supreme Court will decide? 

    Tell us in the comments below.

     

    The National Constitution Center is hosting a mock trial to explore whether the health care reform law signed by President Obama in 2010 — better known on by some as ‘Obama Care’ — is constitutional or not. Waht do you think?

    In a week, the U.S. Supreme Court will hear oral arguments in the case of Department of Health and Human Services v. Florida, a case that could nullify the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA) — better known by some as ‘Obama Care’.

    The National Constitution Center is hosting a mock trial to explore whether the health care reform law, signed by President Obama in 2010, is constitutional or not.

    A former Acting Solicitor General in the Obama Administration, will argue in favor of the PPACA, and the director of the Yale Law School Supreme Court Clinic, will argue against it. A former appellate court judge will preside with a panel of federal judges, law professors, and legal scholars.

    Last year a U.S. district judge in Florida ruled that a health insurance mandate in the act fell outside of federal authority, and because the provision cannot be separated from the rest of the PPACA, the entire law must be struck down. The Eleventh Circuit Court of Appeals disagreed, saying that while the mandate was unconstitutional, the rest of the act could remain in effect. The federal government petitioned for the U.S. Supreme Court to review the ruling.

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