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    Gallup polls American sentiment following election

     President-elect Donald Trump, and his wife Melania gives a thumbs-up while walking on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, Nov. 10, 2016. (Molly Riley/AP Photo)

    President-elect Donald Trump, and his wife Melania gives a thumbs-up while walking on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, Nov. 10, 2016. (Molly Riley/AP Photo)

    NewsWorks Tonight host Dave Heller sits down for his weekly conversation with Gallup’s Frank Newport to talk about trends in U.S. opinion.

    Despite evident despair and protests among those who did not vote for Trump, the percentage of Americans who are afraid after the election is only marginally higher than after the 2012 election. Similarly, the percentage who are excited is only marginally lower than in 2012. So, although this election is not generating the excitement of 2008, the aftermath is not dramatically different than 2012.

    As many Americans are as likely to say they are excited by the election results as say they are devastated.

    At the national level, the polls were quite accurate in predicting her popular vote win. In fact, the national polls were as accurate if not more accurate than in previous elections.

    The big issue this election were a). state polls — which for a number of reasons are not as precise, and b). pseudo-scientific forecasting models which put a veneer on state polls.

    The biggest positives for the Trump administration are the expectation that he will help the nation create more jobs, and improve the economy, improve the illegal immigration situation, improve education, and cut taxes.

    There are low expectations that he will be able to improve the environment, improve race relations, keep us out of war, and heal divisions within the country.

    Listen to their conversation below.

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