Former Philly sheriff could go to jail in fraud scheme

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 Former Philadelphia Sheriff John Green pleaded not guilty to corruption charges at the federal courthouse in Philadelphia. (Image via Carol M. Highsmith Archive, Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division)

Former Philadelphia Sheriff John Green pleaded not guilty to corruption charges at the federal courthouse in Philadelphia. (Image via Carol M. Highsmith Archive, Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division)

Former Philadelphia Sheriff John Green has pleaded not guilty to fraud and corruption charges.  

Green was brought in handcuffs Friday to the magistrate at the federal courthouse where he waived the reading of the indictment and entered his not guilty plea.  

Green is accused of failing to properly do the job he held for 22 years, said federal prosecutor Christopher Diviny.

“The allegations against him are that he essentially had a stream of benefits that were given to him by an individual by the name of James Davis, who owned a business that did business with the sheriff’s office,” Diviny said.

Prosecutors said Davis of Wyncote contributed more than $200,000 to Green’s 2007 campaign and gave him another $300,000 in gifts and loans for his Florida retirement home.

Green, they contend, in exchange steered foreclosure contracts to Davis’ advertising and title companies.

Green denies the allegations, said attorney Peter Scuderi, adding that he must review more than a million seized documents.

“I haven’t evaluated the indictment yet, so I can’t tell you particularly what they are saying, but he’s ready to go to trial,” Scuderi said.

Both men are charged with honest services fraud and conspiracy. Davis is also charged with tax violations.

Green is free on bail pending trial and will return to Florida to await his day in court — which isn’t expected to happen before the spring.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.  

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