NBA players appear in Germantown charity basketball game and lose

 

 

An automated external defibrillator might have saved the life of Mt. Airy-native Daniel Rumph, who died in 2005 after a basketball game at the Mallery Recreation Center in Germantown.

Rumph was a 21-year-old star basketball player for Western Kentucky University. It was later determined that he died from the heart disease, Hypertrophy Cardiomyopathy and there was no defibrillator present at the recreation center, which his family says could have saved his life. By the time paramedics arrived 31 minutes later, it was too late.

The rec center at 100 E. Johnson Street was later renamed the Daniel E. Rumph II Recreation Center.

On Monday night, as powerful thunderstorms brought bright flashes of lightening and the rumble of thunder, family and friends held the final game in the sixth annual “Save The Next Bright Star” fundraising basketball tournament.

The money raised is for the Daniel E. Rumph II Foundation, which hopes to supply every Philadelphia-area recreation centers with Automated External Defibrillators or AEDs.

Danny’s mother, Candy Owens and his uncle, Marcus Owens, started the foundation.

On Monday night the game featured many of Rumph’s former teammates on team Rumph. They had the challenge of going head-to-head with Pros.

A number of NBA players hit the court including Philadelphia heroes:

Hakim Warrick

Mardy Collins

Marcus Morris

Markieff Morris

Marreese Speights

Team Rumph won the game 67-65, which set off a huge celebration from the crowd. Justin Scott told NewsWorks It was the second time in a row team Rumph won this tournament. Justin – an assistant coach at Arcadia – was present the day Danny collapsed and explained that the whole team grew up with Danny. “We will keep the memory of Danny alive forever”, Justin stated as the night concluded.

In the video below Philly-native Hakim Warrick of the Phoenix Suns makes a great slam-dunk shot.

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