Lessons for other cities from Philly’s failed attempt at universal broadband

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    In the recent “net neutrality” ruling, the FCC declared Internet access to be a public utility, like water or electricity.  It paves the way for more cities to consider offering Internet service to their residents.

     

    As a pioneer in that arena — albeit a failed one — Philadelphia’s foible could be fodder for other cities’ forays. Tony Abraham probed that possibility in a TechnicallyPhilly article. He spoke about it with NewsWorks Tonight host Dave Heller.

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