Push for veterans group to move into vacant Hermit Street location continues

 At a meeting last week, the Wissahickon Interested Citizens Association discussed a proposed plans for 504-506 Hermit St. (Marcus McCarthy/for NewsWorks)

At a meeting last week, the Wissahickon Interested Citizens Association discussed a proposed plans for 504-506 Hermit St. (Marcus McCarthy/for NewsWorks)

The former Wissahickon Community Ambulance headquarters building at 504-508 Hermit St. may soon be owned by a local veteran’s organization.

Local residents at the Wissahickon Interested Citizens Association meeting last week received the proposal and looked to move it forward.

Originally located at 133 Shurs Ln., The Adam Kowalski Post 1 Polish was unable to cover expenses and sold the property. Aiming to relocate to the Hermit Street location, the organization’s representing lawyer, Paul T. Sosnowski, said they could purchase the property as early as next month.

The reaction to the proposal varied from the response received at the Wissahickon Neighbors Civic Association the week earlier. Members of WICA applauded the proposal, contrasting it to a widely unpopular Domino’s proposal that was withdrawn last month. 

Concerns did arise over the fate of the post’s liquor license if the veteran’s organization were to go out of business down the road.

Sosnowski, a former assistant counsel for the state Liquor Control Board, said they would be willing to enter an agreement with the two local community groups that would guarantee the fate of the liquor license.

WICA members agreed to contact the WNCA to develop the details of this agreement.

Other business

Also discussed at the WICA meeting was a city project set to start in July that would see the possible shut down and subsequent re-routing of traffic around a section of Ridge Avenue.

Local residents feared the possibility of bus routes 9 and 65 being shut down, something WICA officials were confident wasn’t in the plans.

However, the association’s members said they will seek further information on the project plans from the city.

Chip Roller, vice president of the WICA, proposed a mural for the Wissahickon Station, which serves as a frequented stop for the regional rail and numerous bus lines. Roller said his vision for the mural would be a depiction of the station in the early 20th Century along the eastern side of the outbound wall of the station.

Residents appeared to like the idea but Roller stressed he was tossing an idea around and there were no formal plans in place for a mural.

“I’m just thinking it would be a nice addition to the place,” Roller said. “It could be a real nice look.”

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