Kaine celebrates debate at rally in Philly [photos]

    Democratic presidential nominee for Vice President Tim Kaine rallies at Sheet Metal Workers Local Union 19 Hall in Philadelphia, on Wednesday. (Bastiaan Slabbers for NewsWorks)

    Democratic presidential nominee for Vice President Tim Kaine rallies at Sheet Metal Workers Local Union 19 Hall in Philadelphia, on Wednesday. (Bastiaan Slabbers for NewsWorks)

    Fresh from Tuesday’s vice presidential debate, Democratic candidate Tim Kaine spoke at a rally in South Philadelphia Wednesday, reciting his favorite moments and reveling in the chance to keep pounding Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump.

    “I got dinged a little bit, even by my wife a little bit, about interrupting too much,” Kaine said with a chuckle.

    “The debate was a little feisty, I got to admit. I am Irish,” Kaine said. Republican vice presidential nominee Mike Pence “came in wanted to lay some gloves onto Hillary Clinton, and didn’t get to do anything … I never played hockey, but I think I’d be a pretty good goalie.”

    Kaine said a New York Times story about the possibility that Trump may not have paid taxes for several years “makes me very, very angry” because his son in the Marine Corps deserves that support.And he referred to the $916 million loss Trump claimed on his 1995 taxes, according to the Times.

    “I guess it takes a lot of genius to lose a billion dollars,” Kaine said, “and this is the kind of genius you want running the whole American economy? You got to be kidding me.”

    When Kaine was finished working out on Trump, he talked about the history-making character of putting the first woman in the Oval Office. And he urged the crowd to make sure it happens.

    “Let’s talk about how we’re going to win this thing,” he said. “It’s close. Just eight days ago it was even. It looks pretty good now, but I’m not sure what’s going to happen in the next eight days.”

    “In every election, I put this thought in the back of my head — that I’m the underdog until I win it,” Kaine said. “That’s how you have to run every race.”

    The crowd of about 400 packed into the hall of the Sheet Metal Workers Local 19 on Columbus Boulevard near Washington Avenue wasn’t entirely a labor crowd.

    Mark Feldman, a retiree living in Queen Village, said he got an email from the Clinton campaign and decided to come.

    His wife, Nancy, volunteers in the campaign, and he plans to join her in the effort

    “This is different from past elections,” said Feldman. “I think Hillary is smart, capable and qualified, but the real imperative is stopping Trump. Having him in the White House would be a disaster.”

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