Graduation Recital by Elizabeth White-Clark, harp

Elizabeth White-Clark, harpist

A graduation recital by Elizabeth White-Clark, harp. Elizabeth is a native of Salt Lake City, and studied at Curtis with Elizabeth Hainen and Judy Loman Her program:

Scarlatti: Sonata in E major, K.380
The Baroque-era composer Domenico Scarlatti produced literally hundreds of keyboard works, but few more popular than this lovely sonata. Elizabeth plays an arrangement for harp of this music originally composed for harpsichord.

Bach: Andante from Sonata No.2 in A minor, BWV 1003
The great French harpist Marcel Grandjany arranged this music from Bach’s Violin Sonata No.2, which dates from 1720. The second Sonata is one of a group of Bach’s monumental Six Partitas and Sonatas.

Reinhold: Impromptu
Elizabeth’s teacher at Curtis, Elizabeth Hainen, is principal harp of the Philadelphia Orchestra, and arranged this music by Hugo Reinhold. Reinhold (1854-1935) was a piano teacher at Vienna’s Akademie der Tonkunst. In addition, Reinhold composed a large number of works, primarily for the piano and chamber combinations.

Alvars: Introduction, Cadenza and Rondo
The French harpist and composer Henriette Renie lived from 1875 to 1956, and is renowned as a trailblazing composer at a time when women were discouraged from working in this form. She is also revered by harpists for a method which is used to this day. The four movements of the trio are marked: Allegro risoluto; Scherzo; Andante; and Final.

Renie: Trio for Harp, Violin and Cello
With Alexandra Switala, violin and Will Chow, cello
The French harpist and composer Henriette Renie lived from 1875 to 1956, and is renowned as a trailblazing composer at a time when women were discouraged from working in this form. She is also revered by harpists for a method which is used to this day. The four movements of the trio are marked: Allegro risoluto; Scherzo; Andante; and Final.

Music Word of the Week: andante
“Moderately slow; since the late 18th century it is taken to indicate a speed between adagio and allegro.” (from the Oxford Dictionary of Music)

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