How well does environmentally friendly storm water runoff control really work?

     In this file photo, Floyd Eiseman, a board member of the Loyalhanna Watershed Association, measures the force of runoff from a flooded underground coal mine in Latrobe, Pa., Friday, March 3, 2006. (Andrew Rush/AP Photo)

    In this file photo, Floyd Eiseman, a board member of the Loyalhanna Watershed Association, measures the force of runoff from a flooded underground coal mine in Latrobe, Pa., Friday, March 3, 2006. (Andrew Rush/AP Photo)

    The Philadelphia Water Department has received national recognition for its efforts to control storm water runoff with environmentally friendly methods, rather than building bigger and bigger sewer pipes.  Other cities have taken note and are developing their own “green” infrastructure projects.

    The Allegheny Front’s Ashley Murray reports that determining how well these green projects actually work is the next challenge.

    Listen to Muray’s reporting below.

    The Allegheny Front reports on environmental issues in Pennsylvania. This story is part of their series, Headwaters, exploring the Ohio River watershed, in partnership with West Virginia Public Broadcasting, and funded by the Benedum Foundation.

    Want a digest of WHYY’s programs, events & stories? Sign up for our weekly newsletter.

    It will take 126,000 members this year for great news and programs to thrive. Help us get to 100% of the goal.