Gallup nixes presidential horserace polling; Americans jaded on Congress

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    NewsWorks Tonight host Dave Heller sits down for his weekly conversation with Gallup’s Frank Newport to talk about trends in American opinion.
     

    Breaking a decades-long tradition, Gallup has decided not to conduct polls of support in the 2016 presidential primaries.

    Gallup’s editor in chief Frank Newport explains the organization’s decision, which comes nearly three years after its criticism of its 2012 polling accuracy and raises important questions about the role and capabilities of of polling in elections.

    We know that Americans are down on Congress in general, but new evidence shows that Americans are also now — more than ever — likely to say that their own member of Congress is beholden to special interests, corrupt, and out of touch with his or her constituents.

    The Supreme Court began its new session this week. The data indicate that Americans’ views of the job the Justices are doing is becoming just as politicized as their views of the president.

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