State and federal government reach $41.6 million deal to clean up Delaware superfund site

The Environmental Protection Agency building in Washington. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais, File)

The Environmental Protection Agency building in Washington. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais, File)

The state and federal government have reached a $41.6 million settlement with 21 defendants deemed responsible for the clean up of a 27-acre superfund site in Delaware.

The Delaware Sand & Gravel Landfill Superfund Site in New Castle County has been on an EPA national priorities list for most contaminated sites since 1981.

Between 1969 and 1976, approximately 550,000 cubic yards of industrial waste and construction debris, including at least 13,000 drums containing hazardous substances, were dumped in the former  sand and gravel quarry.

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The 21 defendants include some of the most prominent Delaware companies:

  • The Chemours Company FC, LLC;
  • Hercules LLC
  • Waste Management of Delaware, Inc.
  • SC Holdings, Inc.
  • Cytec Industries, Inc.
  • Zeneca Inc.
  • Bayer CropScience Inc.
  • BP Amoco Chemical Company (now known as INEOS US Chemicals Company)
  • Chevron U.S.A. Inc.
  • CNA Holdings LLC (as successor-in-interest to Hoechst-Celanese Corporation)
  • E.I. du Pont de Nemours and Company
  • Esschem, Inc.
  • FMC Corporation
  • The Goodyear Tire & Rubber Company
  • Honeywell International Inc. (as successor to AlliedSignal, Inc.)
  • Clarios LLC, successor to the former Johnson Controls, Inc.
  • KLHC, Inc. (as successor-in-interest to Ludlow Corporation)
  • M.A. Hanna Plastic Group, Inc. (as successor-in-interest to Cadillac Plastic Group, Inc.)
  • New Castle County
  • Occidental Chemical Corporation
  • Verizon Delaware LLC (as successor to The Diamond State Telephone Company).
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The so-called “Superfund” law requires landowners, waste generators, and waste transporters responsible for contaminating a Superfund site to clean it up.

U..S. Environmental Protection Agency Officials say this settlement means such efforts will continue.

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