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Programming on WHYY


Wider Horizons presents programming focusing on issues such as caregiving, end-of-life, creativity, social engagement and improving quality of life. In addition to the following radio archives and television programs, see archived webcasts and web conversations.




AGING


Aging and Caring for Elders

Not only is a large proportion of the population old, people are also living longer. Elder care, aging, and quality of life in old age are issues that will become increasingly important. Bioethicist Dr. Stephen Post discusses trends and the importance of love on Voices in the Family with Dan Gottlieb, Ph.D. They are joined by Brian Duke of WHYY's Wider Horizons Service, who shares the lived experience of caring for loved ones with Alzheimer's and offers resources for caregivers in our region.

Listen via Real Audio


Mental Health and Aging

Depression and dementia are prevalent among the rising numbers of elderly people in the United States. The high rates have given rise to the belief that mental illness is a normal part of aging - but that is far from the truth. Voices in the Family host Dr. Dan Gottlieb discusses mental health and aging with Dr. Ira Katz, geriatric psychiatrist at the University of Pennsylvania. We'll also hear from Rabbi Zalman Schachter, author of "From Aging to Saging."

Listen via Real Audio


Fear and Aging

A growing body of research published in gerontology journals finds that the fear of falling is a big reason seniors adopt a sedentary lifestyle. From member station WGBH in Boston, Madge Kaplan reports on older women at one senior housing complex and a class that helps them with their struggle to stay mobile and unafraid. Aired November 25, 2003 on NPR's Morning Edition.

Listen Via Real Audio


Age and Creativity

Many people believe that our creativity "dries up" in mid-life - that we start to run out of ideas, or begin to repeat ourselves. Truth is that many artists do some of their best work late in life, just think about Pablo Picasso, or playwright George Bernard Shaw. Creativity can also positively influence the way we age. Dr. Dan Gottlieb's guest on Voices in the Family is Dr. Gene Cohen, author of "The Creative Age." They will explore how creativity changes as we age, and how being creative keeps the brain active and alert. We will also hear from renowned Philadelphia painter Quita Brodhead. Brodhead is over a century old, and her work is currently exhibited at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts.

Listen via Real Audio


Aging in America: The Years Ahead

Filmed over the course of seven years, this award-winning program examines attitudes toward growing older through a series of intimate vignettes.

See photographs from the project.


Easy Living with Katie and Gene Hamilton

Wider Horizons presents a series of spots highlighting some simple things you can do around your home:
Add a Dimmer Switch
Install a Grab Bar
Install a Lever Door Lockset
Get a Grip Gadgets

Wider Horizons Kickoff Week

In May 2000, WHYY offered a taste of the Wider Horizons service with a special week of programming on TV12, 91FM and whyy.org. The programs were:
Wider Horizons: Health
Wider Horizons: Wealth
Wider Horizons: Wisdom


An Examination of Aging

The number of Americans over age 65 will double in the next 20 years, as the baby boomer generation comes of age. What adjustments will our society need to make to accommodate a graying population? A discussion of the challenges facing older people and find out what researchers are doing to meet their needs -- from health care that specializes in older people, to programs that help seniors live independently, to technology specially designed for aging hands and eyes.

Listen via Real Audio


Senior Drivers

Amy Tardif of member station WGCU in Ft. Myers reports that a new Florida law making it harder for seniors to renew their driver's licenses could mean real hardship to those that fail vision tests. The new law mandates a vision test for those over 80 who want to renew their license. But there are few reliable alternative means of getting around for those who fail.

Listen via Real Audio


Carved in Sand: Why Memory Fades in Midlife

NPR's Alex Chadwick talks with Cathryn Jakobson Ramin about progressive memory loss among adults in their 50s and 60s. Ramin is author of the upcoming book Carved in Sand: Why Memory Fades in Midlife.

Listen via Real Audio


Healthy Aging

As baby boomers approach their "golden years," the science of aging has been picking up speed. From Alzheimer's disease to end-of-life care, host Ira Flatow and guess discuss the problems of a graying population and what scientists are doing to try and solve them.

Listen via Real Audio


Happy Aging

A new study shows that a positive attitude about aging can contribute to a longer, happier life - even more than low cholesterol or regular exercise. The report finds that the negative images of aging and the elderly in popular culture can have serious health consequences, lowering some individuals' will to live. NPR's Richard Knox reports.

Listen via Real Audio


How Are the Elderly Changing?

Nowadays it's common to see grandparents roller blading, jogging or bike riding with the grandkids. And with baby boomers preparing for retirement, you can bet they'll redefine this stage of life like they have adolescence, marriage and parenthood. How is living a longer, more vigorous life affecting the American family? Will the reality of old age sneak up on the forever-young baby boomers? What happens when one spouse remains active, while the other is debilitated? What role does depression play? Join Juan Williams to discuss the Changing Face of the Elderly in America.

Listen via Real Audio


Memory and Remembering

Let's face it -- we all forget things. Where we put the car keys, the name of the person we just met, the doctor's appointment we made last week. Although it can happen at any age, research shows that many of us begin to see changes in our memory function around age 50. While loss of memory is considered a normal part of aging, other factors like diet and lifestyle can also affect our ability to remember things. Join Brooke Gladstone and guests for a discussion of how memory works, why it sometimes doesn't and how it can be improved.

Listen via Real Audio


Schizophrenia and Aging

NPR's Wendy Schmelzer reports on the relationship between schizophrenia and aging. Researchers are paying particular attention to "late onset schizophrenia," which occurs after age 45. But they also are studying how the aging process affects people who develop the disease earlier in life. Healthcare providers are concerned about how to provide adequate medical attention to people with schizophrenia, as the overall population ages.

Listen via Real Audio


Boomers and Aging

Baby boomers will change forever how we define aging. We'll discuss how advances in medical technology promise a gentler experience as boomers edge closer to their golden years, and what these improvements will mean for the young and the rest of us.

Listen via Real Audio


AARP Report On the 'Sandwich Generation'

There's the baby boom generation, Gen-X, and of course "The Greatest Generation." But have you ever heard of the "sandwich" generation? There middle-aged, from different backgrounds, taking care of both parents and kids. How is the sandwich generation juggling so many family responsibilities?

Listen via Real Audio


Playing with Pain Beyond Age 50

A new study indicates that those over age 50 are actually better able to cope with pain than younger people.

Listen via Real Audio


ALZHEIMER'S AND DEMENTIA


The Forgetting: A Portrait of Alzheimer's

A 90-minute national PBS special aimed at helping Americans better understand and cope with the fearsome disease of Alzheimer's. Based on David Shenk's best-selling book The Forgetting - Alzheimer's: Portrait of an Epidemic, the documentary weaves together the history and biology of the disease, the intense real-world experiences of Alzheimer's patients and caregivers, and the race to find a cure. Premiered January, 2004.


Circle of Love: Living with Alzheimer's

WHYY's first-person documentary follows the daily lives of Carol Francis, caring for her husband, Alfred, who suffers from Alzheimer's Disease, and Florence Collins, whose husband, Russell, suffers from Frontotemporal Dementia. Part of Wider Horizons' Circle of Love series on caregiving and chronic illness, which premiered in January, 2004. A resource guide compiled by WHYY's Caring Community coalition is offered online and at 215-351-2095.


Alzheimer's Disease

WHYY's 91FM Voices in the Family, hosted by Dr. Dan Gottlieb Ph.D., presented a one-hour special on Alzheimer's which was offered nationally to public radio stations on January 12, 2004, as a complement to the PBS program The Forgetting.

Listen via RealAudio.


Learning to Speak Alzheimer's

Joanne Koenig-Coste developed an innovative approach to caring for her husband, who was diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease shortly after the birth of their fourth child. Called "habilitation," her approach focuses on enabling the person with dementia to live using his or her upper limits of function, intellect, emotion and spirit. "Learning to Speak Alzheimer's" is the title of her new book. This Radio Times interview aired November 3, 2003.

Listen via Real Audio


Mental Health and Aging

Depression and dementia are prevalent among the rising numbers of elderly people in the United States. The high rates have given rise to the belief that mental illness is a normal part of aging - but that is far from the truth. Voices in the Family host Dr. Dan Gottlieb discusses mental health and aging with Dr. Ira Katz, geriatric psychiatrist at the University of Pennsylvania. We'll also hear from Rabbi Zalman Schachter, author of "From Aging to Saging."

Listen via Real Audio


Alzheimer's Disease Update

A recent survey found that 4 million Americans have Alzheimer's disease, 19 million Americans have a family member with Alzheimer's, and 37 million Americans know someone with the disease. But scientists still have a long way to go just to understand the complex causes of Alzheimer's, let alone prevent it. In this hour of Science Friday, we'll take a look at the latest in Alzheimer's research. Are we any closer to understanding - and preventing - one of the most serious diseases of aging?

Listen via Real Audio


CARING FOR AGING PARENTS


Taking Care of an Aging Parent

WHYY 91FM's Radio Times with Marty Moss-Coane discusses the care of an aging parent with Jerald Winakur MD who has practiced geriatric medicine for over 30 years. He recently wrote "What Are We Going to do with Dad," a commentary on caring for a growing elderly population in the journal Health Affairs from a dual perspective: not only as a health professional, but also the son of an 86-year-old man suffering from dementia.

Listen via Real Audio


Aging, and Caring for our Elders

Older Americans compose a larger proportion of the United States' population than ever before. What does the aging of America mean to our society? Are we prepared to care for our elders? How are people defining their own old age in a culture that's obsessed with youth? WHYY Children's service presents this In The Spirit of the Family program moderated by Dr. Dan Gottlieb of WHYY 91FM's Voices in the Family with guests Vivian Greenberg and Brian Duke.

Listen via Real Audio


And Thou Shalt Honor

Voices in the Family presented a special program on caregiving in which host Dr. Dan Gottlieb interviewed one of the producers of the PBS program And Thou Shalt Honor and caregiving experts responded to listeners' calls.

Listen via Real Audio.


Circle of Love: Caring for an Aging Parent

WHYY's first-person documentary tells the story of Ana Mulero, a Latina woman from Philadelphia whose mother does not speak English and is clinically depressed. Part of Wider Horizons' Circle of Love series on caregiving and chronic illness. A resource guide compiled by WHYY's Caring Community coalition is offered online and at 215-351-2095.


Aging and Caring for Elders

Not only is a large proportion of the population old, people are also living longer. Elder care, aging, and quality of life in old age are issues that will become increasingly important. Bioethicist Dr. Stephen Post discusses trends and the importance of love on Voices in the Family with Dan Gottlieb, Ph.D. They are joined by Brian Duke of WHYY's Wider Horizons Service, who shares the lived experience of caring for loved ones with Alzheimer's and offers resources for caregivers in our region.

Listen via Real Audio


Reformers Seek to Reinvent Nursing Homes

Many people think of nursing homes as grim places where residents often seem bored, lonely and sad. But now some reformers are experimenting with a new kind of nursing home. Instead of an institutional setting, they want to provide a homelike atmosphere for residents.

Listen via Real Audio


Eldercare

An eighteen month Federal investigation found that incidents of abuse in nursing homes DO NOT get reported promptly, and are rarely prosecuted. So, how do we ensure proper care for the elderly?

Listen via Real Audio


More Seniors Explore Reverse Mortgage Option

The National Council on the Aging says that a growing segment of senior citizens are taking out what's called a reverse mortgage in order to remain at home. The loan allows homeowners 62 or older to tap into their homes' equity for a lump sum, monthly payments or a line of credit.

Listen via Real Audio


Senior In-Home Care

NPR s Chris Arnold reports on advances in non-medical services for the elderly.

Listen via Real Audio


Doctors Share Their Woes Caring for Aging Parents

Caring for an aging parent or relative can be a frustrating experience. Decisions need to be made quickly, often with little information. Doctors can disagree on their diagnoses, and it's not always clear what's covered by insurance. The result is that many families end up feeling overwhelmed.

Listen via Real Audio


Commentary: A Road Trip with an Aging Father

Bennie Currie never thought about taking care of his father until they had to go on a road trip together. Currie explores the challenges of taking care of his aging father.

Listen via Real Audio


CARING FOR CHILDREN


Grandparents Raising Grandchildren

September 18, 2000

Almost four million children in the U.S. are being raised by their grandparents. For the grandparents, this means a "second shift" in parenting, instead of traveling, retirement, or taking things easy. It also places an intense emotional and financial burden on the grandparents. Dr. Dan Gottlieb will be joined by nationally recognized experts in the field, and we'll also hear from grandparents who are raising their grandchildren.

Listen via Real Audio


Caring for Children with Special Needs

WHYY's first-person documentary takes viewers into the home of a Cherry Hill, New Jersey, couple who have four young children, of whom three have disabilities such as autism, mosaic down syndrome and mosaic fragile X. Part of Wider Horizons' Circle of Love series on caregiving and chronic illness. A resource guide compiled by WHYY's Caring Community coalition is offered online and at 215-351-2095.


CAREGIVING AND CHRONIC ILLNESS


WHYY's series of first-person documentaries, Circle of Love, follow the lives of local families dealing with chronic illness and caregiving:


Living with Alzheimer's

Caring for Children with Special Needs

Caring for an Aging Parent


WHYY's documentaries premiered in January, 2004 as part of a comprehensive, community-based campaign Outreach to Caregivers of the Chronically Ill funded by Sound Partners for Community Health, a national project of the Benton Foundation funded by The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. The first-person television documentaries include footage filmed by family caregivers themselves. A resource guide compiled by WHYY's Caring Community coalition is offered online and at 215-351-2095.


Chronic Pain

Voices in the Family host Dr. Dan Gottlieb discusses a new book called "Conquering Chronic Pain After Injury." Guests on the program include William H. Simon, MD, an orthopedic surgeon at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, and Arnold Sadwin, MD, psychiatrist at the Institute of Pennsylvania Hospital and the Belmont Center for Comprehensive Treatment.

Listen via Real Audio


Medical Malpractice

Chances are, you have heard a horror story about a hospital visit lately - about someone being treated by hurried, seemingly uncaring doctors. What has happened to the profession of healing? On Voices in the Family, Dr. Dan Gottlieb discusses the bond between patient and doctor with cardiologist and poet John Stone. Medical malpractice and how it's affecting healthcare is also discussed with Rosemary Gibson, author of "Wall of Silence." Aired October 13, 2003.

Listen via Real Audio


END-OF-LIFE


In September, 2000, Bill Moyers began a national conversation about the "last taboo" - death and dying - through his extraordinary television series On Our Own Terms. WHYY has continued to produce and air radio and television programming as well as webcasts around end-of-life issues in collaboration with its Caring Community Coalition.


Terry Gross interviewed Bill Moyers on Fresh Air, broadcast Wednesday, September 6, 2000. Listen to the interview about his PBS series and about his own encounters with the deaths of family and friends.


The Hospice Experiment

Tune to WHYY-91FM at noon on Monday, July 26th for a new American Radio Works documentary about the founders of the hospice movement, the story of four women: Cicely Saunders, who started the first hospice in England in 1967; Florence Wald, who was dean of nursing at Yale when she created America s first hospice program in Branford, CT in 1974; Swiss-born Elisabeth Kuebler-Ross (now living in Scottsdale, Arizona), who became the leading spokesperson for hospice. She was based at the University of Chicago, and is known for her landmark book, On Death and Dying; and a hospice patient, Kitty Shenay, 78, of Raleigh-Durham, NC, who invited ARW to witness her last two months of life in hospice. She died of pancreatic cancer this spring. (She was born in Fayetteville, NC.)


Caring for a Dying Loved One

How families make decisions about the care of a dying loved one. We'll talk with Terri Maxwell, who spent her career as a nurse caring for patients at the end of life. She is a former Executive Director for the Center for Palliative Care in the Department of Family Medicine at Thomas Jefferson University in Philadelphia.

Listen to this show via Real Audio


End of Life

The case of Florida woman Terry Schiavo raises many important issues about the end of life. How should we discuss death with our families, what kinds of wishes should we specify? Voices in the Family's Dr. Dan Gottlieb takes an in-depth look at the end of life from different perspectives. We'll hear from lawyer Vincent Russo who specializes in living wills. We'll also discuss family dynamics at the end of life with Dr. Mimi Mahon, a palliative care nurse and senior fellow at the University of Penn Center for Bio-Ethics. Finally, we'll discuss the meaning of life and death with Stephen Levine, Buddhist teacher and author of several best-selling books, among them "Who Dies," and "A Year to Live."

Listen via Real Audio


Death and Dying, Part I: The Circle of Life

Wider Horizons presented two special Voices in the Family programs in November, 2001, hosted by Dr. Dan Gottlieb, to coincide with the Knight Ridder newspaper series Finding Our Way: Living with Dying in America.


From the time we are children, we are aware that one day we will die. Yet we avoid thinking about death and dying almost all our lives. In a country obsessed with youth and beauty, death has been a taboo topic for decades. Lately, this has been changing, a conversation has been started. Dr. Dan Gottlieb hosts a special program The Circle of Life, a discussion that explores America's views on death and dying. 88 year - old Pulitzer Prize winning writer Studs Terkel talks about his new book on death and faith, Will the Circle Be Unbroken. We'll discuss our need for ritual with Megory Anderson of the Sacred Dying Foundation in California and Funeral Director and Poet Thomas Lynch takes us inside the world of undertakers. We'll also hear from cancer survivors who have beaten incredible odds and find out why pet funerals are more popular than ever.


Death and Dying, Part II: What is a Good Death?

November 26, 2001

Dr. Dan Gottlieb's guests are nationally recognized palliative care expert Dr. Ira Byock and Dr. Terri Maxwell, Executive Director of the Center for Palliative Care at Thomas Jefferson University. They will discuss how we can improve end-of-life care, what people are afraid of as they are facing death, and what challenges their care takers face.

Listen via Real Audio


The Circle of Life

September 11, 2000

Throughout most of our lives, we know that we have to die. Yet few of us prepare for this day, or discuss our wishes with family members. Dr. Dan Gottlieb discusses how people deal with life and death in light of terminal illness, how we first learn about death, and how today's health care professionals think about death and dying. Ellen Kushner, host of WGBH's "Sound and Spirit" joins Dr. Gottlieb to explore how other cultures and religions treat death and mourning.

Listen via Real Audio


In addition, Dr. Dan Gottlieb hosted a series of radio programs in conjunction with Bill Moyers' PBS special On Our Own Terms, in which he interviewed local experts on deathand dying and took questions and comments on the programs from the community.


Heart-to-Heart: Caring for the Dying - Respecting Diversity

Respecting Diversity looks at the influence of culture, race and religion on dying, and how the assumptions behind "good end-of-life care" do not necessarily match the needs of people who are not white and middle class. Aired November 24, 2003. www.hearttoheartradio.org

Listen to an excerpt


Exploring Death in America

Listen and read the transcripts of this National Public Radio series -- an exceptionally wide-ranging and well-balanced collection of "voices" and resources; including bibliographies, interviews, chapters from important texts and personal stories, poetry and theatre.


End of Life Decisions

The experience of dying has changed over the past several decades. Advances in medical technology have allowed terminally ill patients to stay alive longer than ever before. And families are left to make decisions about when a loved one's life should end... Join Juan Williams as he talks with experts about making those kinds of decisions effectively on this edition of Talk of the Nation from NPR News.

Listen via Real Audio


SOCIAL ENGAGEMENT


Hometown Legends

WHYY-TV12 highlights the lives of people from the Delaware Valley who have become legends.


Retirement

Dr. Dan Gottlieb and his guests, Robert Weiss, author of The Experience of Retirement and Nancy Schlossberg, author of Retire Smart, Retire Happy: Finding Your True Path in Life will discuss the experience of retirement from the process of leaving work to the social, economic, and familial challenges that retirees face.

Listen online (Originally broadcast January 23, 2006)


Historical Marker Project

From April 2003 through December 2003 WHYY 91 FM aired 34 stories focused on the history of Southeastern Pennsylvania. The series explores the stories behind the markers. Each 4-5 minute audio feature grapples with major themes in the region's history. For more information go to www.whyy.org/91FM/markers.html or www.explorePAhistory.com


Digital Generations: More Seniors Logging On to the Web

A look at an age group seemingly least likely to go online: senior citizens. Less than one-quarter of U.S. seniors currently venture onto the Web - but that's changing as the Baby Boom generation begins to retire. Hear NPR's Catrin Einhorn.

Listen via Real Audio


Volunteerism

In his State of the Union message, President Bush called on Americans to donate two years' worth of time to volunteering. Mr. Bush said he wants to double the number of Peace Corps volunteers in five years, and to increase AmeriCorps and Senior Corps. Since Sept. 11, more people have reached out to volunteer. Join host Neal Conan and guests for a discussion about volunteerism in America.

Listen via Real Audio


The Trouble with Being Single and a Senior

Valentine's Day can be trying for singles, even more so for solo senior citizens. We hear from attendees at Chicago's annual Sweetheart's Ball for Seniors about their search for romance.

Listen via Real Audio


Retirees Returning to Work

Help Wanted: experienced employee for entry-level position. The right candidate will have a flexible schedule, a pleasant attitude and a social security check. Join NPR's Neal Conan and guests to look at why big companies are actively recruiting retirees.

Listen via Real Audio


How Are the Elderly Changing?

Nowadays it's common to see grandparents roller blading, jogging or bike riding with the grandkids. And with baby boomers preparing for retirement, you can bet they'll redefine this stage of life like they have adolescence, marriage and parenthood. How is living a longer, more vigorous life affecting the American family? Will the reality of old age sneak up on the forever-young baby boomers? What happens when one spouse remains active, while the other is debilitated? What role does depression play? Join Juan Williams to discuss the Changing Face of the Elderly in America.

Listen via Real Audio


Boomers and Aging

Baby boomers will change forever how we define aging. We'll discuss how advances in medical technology promise a gentler experience as boomers edge closer to their golden years, and what these improvements will mean for the young and the rest of us.

Listen via Real Audio


AARP Report On the "Sandwich Generation"

There's the baby boom generation, Gen-X, and of course "The Greatest Generation." But have you ever heard of the "sandwich" generation? There middle-aged, from different backgrounds, taking care of both parents and kids. How is the sandwich generation juggling so many family responsibilities?

Listen via Real Audio


Trading in Retirement for Undergraduate Study

There is one obvious distinction between Knight and most of her graduating cap-and-gown clad classmates at Wellesley College in Massachusetts. She is a retired deputy sheriff from Colorado, a grandmother of two and age 64.


WOMEN'S HEALTH


Breast Cancer-Radio Times

The words "you've got breast cancer" evoke a range of intense emotional reactions which make the difficult task of understanding treatment even more challenging. How do women cope with the diagnosis of breast cancer? Our guests Marisa Weiss, a radiation oncologist and founder of breastcancer.org, and Joan Hermann, Fox Chase Cancer Center's director of social work join host Marty Moss Coane in the studio. Aired November 14, 2003.

Listen via Real Audio


Latina Salud

The Latina Health Project is a series of programs and events designed to explore and explain disparities in health status and in access to medical care affecting Hispanic women in the region.