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ADHD in adults



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June 20, 2011 — Millions of adults experience ADHD (Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder), yet only 11% are in treatment. And why is that? Generally ADHD begins in childhood and can look like distractibility. In adolescents, it can look like extreme moodiness. Adults often don’t get diagnosed because, while they’re good at multitasking, they aren’t good at regulating their emotions. It’s when the career and family life suffer that a need for help is clear. Of course, there are many people who are diagnosed with ADHD who really have something else. New research now brings this condition into focus, with increasing attention being paid to emotions and self-regulation. Dr. Dan Gottlieb examines the findings and treatments of ADHD with psychiatrist Tony Rostain. Rostain is Medical Director of the University of Pennsylvania Adult ADHD Treatment and Research Program. He’s a professor of psychiatry and pediatrics at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania.

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