WHYY-FM Sunday Specials


Every Sunday night at 10 p.m., WHYY brings you special programming from public media’s best producers.


May 2016

May 1
A Life Sentence: Victims, Offenders, Justice and My Mother

In 1994, Samantha Broun’s mother was the victim of a violent crime in Nyack, New York. On September 21, a stranger came into her backyard, attacked her and held her captive for 5 hours. This story is about the the political and societal impact of this case, that was felt most acutely in Pennsylvania, where the offender was from. It changed the outcome of a governor’s race. And altered the state constitution.
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May 8
America Abroad

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May 15
Shakespeare Becomes American: Shakespeare in Performance

This program explores how American Shakespeare has been shaped by the American experience. From the very beginning, Americans have sought to make Shakespeare an honorary citizen. Whether we have succeeded in that or not, one thing is clear. On the stage, within the realm of performance we Americans have certainly made Shakespeare our own, bringing to the performance of Shakespeare American passion, language and innovation. Hosted by Sam Waterston.
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May 22
The Father of the Man In America: Shakespeare in Education and Civic Life

After the American Revolution, there were real questions about whether America should adopt British culture and literature — including Shakespeare’s plays — or create its own. This program follows Shakespeare’s path in the years that followed. Hosted by Sam Waterston.
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May 29
Shakespeare is a Black Woman: Shakespeare in American Politics

In 1849, disputes over British and American acting styles touched off a deadly riot. The most famous Black Shakespearean of the 19th century was an American who went to Europe after he saw Black actors arrested for performing Shakespeare in the US. In the 1980s, Shakespeare was drawn into battles over race and gender on college campuses. Hosted by Sam Waterston.
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June 2016

June 5
Truth Be Told

What if we could get better at handling racially charged situations by breaking down our past encounters? That’s what Truth Be Told, a special radio program from KQED and PRI, is all about.
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June 12
America Abroad

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June 19
Invisibilia

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June 26
Invisibilia

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July 2016

July 3
Invisibilia

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July 10
Invisibilia

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July 17
Invisibilia

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July 24
Invisibilia

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July 31
Invisibilia

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August 2016

August 7
America Abroad

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August 14
Presidential Power

The Constitution provides that “all legislative powers herein granted shall be vested in a Congress of the United States”. It goes on to grant Congress a robust – and fearsome – list of powers. James Madison assumed that “[i]n republican government, the legislative authority necessarily predominates,” and he cautioned that the legislative department may tend to “draw all power into its impetuous vortex.” But modern politics and law seem to tell a different story. With executive orders, administrative regulations, creative interpretations of federal statutes and executive agreements with other nations, it may seem the President, not Congress, is wielding the most potent legislative power. But some argue this is nothing new: that the President is not exercising legislative power; but simply exercising his well-established executive discretion. This debate was recorded at Philadelphia’s National Constitution Center.
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August 21
America Abroad

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