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Garlicky Greens




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Recipe By Chef Jim Coleman

If you love sautéed greens, you have to give this recipe a try. Avoid overcooking, and throw plenty of garlic into the pan.

Ingredients

  • Two 1-pound bags of baby spinach, cleaned and stemmed
  • One 1-pound bunch green kale, cleaned and stemmed
  • 2 slices of turkey bacon, chopped
  • 2 teaspoon olive oil
  • ½ medium onion chopped
  • 4 garlic cloves, thinly sliced
  • ½ cup 99% fat free chicken broth
  • 1 teaspoon rice wine vinegar
  • kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • hot sauce to taste

Directions

    1. Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil. Add the kale and boil for seven minutes. Drain well and let cool. Coarsely chop and set aside. Then toss with the baby spinach.
    2. Cook the turkey bacon in a large nonstick skillet over medium heat until crisp, about 5 minutes. Remove with a slotted spoon and drain on paper towels. Add the onion and the garlic to the drippings in the skillet and cook, stirring frequently, until softened, about 5 minutes. Stir in the greens and toss well. Add the broth, cover and cook until the greens are tender, about 5 minutes.
    3. Add the vinegar, toss to combine, and season with salt and pepper to taste. Transfer to a platter, top the greens with the bacon pieces, and serve at once.
Photo by Flicker user YoAmes / CC BY-NC 2.0

Reminder: The ingredients in a recipe determine if it should be eaten every day, some days, or on special occasions. It's up to you and you doctor to determine what can be part of a healthy diet for you and any special needs you may have.


6 Responses to Garlicky Greens

  • Anne Sullivan

    I’m sad to see nature’s perfect food, kale, and runner-up, spinach, compromised by salty, over-processed turkey bacon and chicken broth. So I thought I’d share my favorite way to add flavor to greens: garlic, lemon juice and a tiny sprinkle of smoked paprika….delicious. And the Vitamin C in the lemon juice will help your body absorb the iron in the greens. It’s a win-win situation!

  • Rebecca

    I second the motion of Anne, above. Who needs the “fecal soup” broth that we know is in turkey and chicken products ruining such an amazing healthy dish? (go to http://www.care2.com/c2c/share/detail/127259 for the basic info, but googling gets you a host of links with more background on this disturbing aspect of the average chicken/turkey “production plant.) If you want a little smoked flavor, the smoked paprika is delicious or you can experiment with a variety of simple herbs. I was able to get smoked peppercorns at my local market that were really fantastic.

  • Lari Robling

    Great tips, Anne! I’ll definitely give the smoked paprika a try that sounds delicious.

  • Rebecca

    Why is my comment being held in moderation? Especially when I provide link to back up the health information I am presenting? I submit my comment again, respectfully hoping it gets posted:

    I second the motion of Anne, above. Who needs the “fecal soup” broth that we know is in turkey and chicken products ruining such an amazing healthy dish? (go to http://www.care2.com/c2c/share/detail/127259 for the basic info, but googling gets you a host of links with more background on this disturbing aspect of the average chicken/turkey “production plant.) If you want a little smoked flavor, the smoked paprika is delicious or you can experiment with a variety of simple herbs. I was able to get smoked peppercorns at my local market that were really fantastic.

  • Lari Robling

    Great conversation Anne and Rebecca! I wholeheartedly agree but I also believe that many people need a transition from dishes heavily seasoned with animal fats in the traditional manner . (And, it’s my personal belief that if that’s what one enjoys and it is occasional then enjoy.)
    I think if a diner is used to heavily pork seasoned greens this recipe can be a good in-between step to get to the wonderful dish you describe. If I can’t be perfect every meal at least I hope I am on a continuum that gets me there!

  • Rebecca

    Glad to pass that info on. When I learned about the whole “Fecal soup” thing (in book after book like “Eating Animals”, and in the industry’s own descriptions of protocols) I was pretty grossed out and am so glad there are alternatives, like Anne pointed out. (People really should google this and read up, even if they don’t want to go to the link I provided that gives the “cliff notes”. Because it is really really uncool, the whole process.) There are healthier alternatives.

    ( :

Photo by Flicker user mollycakes / CC BY-NC 2.0



Move Over, Kale Chips! Kale Buds Are Here

By Lari Robling - April 18th, 2012

High Tunnel farming caught my eye because its extended growing season adds to the amount of local produce we get. While farm manager Aviva Asher was tidying up the winter crop to make way for spring, I discovered another benefit of local growing: use what you’ve got.




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