Special Programming from WHYY-FM

Friday, September 9, 2011

Fresh Air Weekend
10 p.m. – 11 p.m.

Highlights from the week’s commemorative programming including interviews with New York firefighters Jay Jonas and Ken Haskell; Book critic Maureen Corrigan’s review of “The Submission;” Linguist Geoff Nunberg on the how 9/11 may or may not have impacted our language; and the Bay State Winds Clarinet Quintet.

Saturday, September 10, 2011

Fresh Air Weekend
1 p.m. – 2 p.m. and 8 p.m. – 9 p.m.

Highlights from the week’s commemorative programming including interviews with New York firefighters Jay Jonas and Ken Haskell; Book critic Maureen Corrigan’s review of “The Submission;” Linguist Geoff Nunberg on the how 9/11 may or may not have impacted our language; and the Bay State Winds Clarinet Quintet.

This American Life
2 p.m. – 3 p.m.

This American Life will revisit people who’ve been on the show previously, whose lives were significantly touched by the Sept 11th attacks.
Included are: Lynn Simpson, who escaped the Twin Towers; Hyder Akbar, an Afghan-American teen whose father – a dry cleaner in the Bay Area – was tapped by Hamid Karzai to return to Afghanistan following the American invasion and become governor of the Kunar region; an American soldier who came home from Iraq and Afghanistan with severe PTSD, who now believes he’s won the battle with his demons; and more.

Living 9/11
3 p.m. – 4 p.m.

Ten years after the terrorist attacks of September 11th, as part of WNYC’s “Decade: 9/11″ coverage, this special explores New Yorkers’ most visceral and immediate emotional reactions to the attack on the World Trade Center and how they are – and are not — still with us today.

Fear and shock, grief and guilt, anger, gratitude and solidarity — these emotions overwhelmed many New Yorkers along with the billowing cloud of smoke and debris after the Towers collapsed.

WNYC’s award-winning news team spent days, months, and then years reporting on the attacks and their aftermath. Through a mix of their recordings at the time and interviews with people ten years later, WNYC reporter Marianne McCune guides us through the stories of people who were directly impacted by what happened and have been struggling for a decade to make sense of it.

Sunday, September 11, 2011

WHYY Special: “Out of the Shadows”
6 a.m. – 7 a.m.

Post-Traumatic Stress has become a buzzword. Mental health professionals, politicians and policy makers vow to address our emotional response to tragic events and crises better and more quickly. But – what have we really learned about addressing trauma in the decade since September 11, 2001?

This hour-long documentary examines the issue of trauma through several lenses, and takes a look at how we cope as individuals, institutions, communities, and countries.

On Being
7 a.m. – 8 a.m.

From St. Paul’s Chapel at the edge of Ground Zero Krista Tippit’s program does not just recall 9/11, it considers how it changed us as a people and what we’ve learned in the meantime. What are we just understanding now? How will we pass on the meaning of this event to future generations?

NPR Special Coverage
8 a.m. – 6 p.m.

Weekend Edition provides live coverage from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m., capturing the day’s events from Ground Zero to the Pentagon, to Shanksville, Pa. and far beyond, with correspondents deployed across the U.S. and around the world. Host Audie Cornish guides the coverage and is joined by NPR military, national security and political correspondents. NPR airs the names of victims as they are read in New York. From the Pentagon, NPR National Security Correspondent Tom Gjelten revisits where he was when American Airlines flight 77 slammed into the heart of U.S. military headquarters. Morning Edition host Renee Montagne reports from Afghanistan.

When Audie goes off the air at 2 p.m., Talk of the Nation host Neal Conan steps in to follow the day’s events and reprises the ceremonies held in the morning. Voices of people touched by 9/11 are included in that coverage, and listeners are invited to call in and share their thoughts and reflections.

NPR’s 9/11 coverage concludes with All Things Considered beginning at 5 p.m. Host Guy Raz and NPR correspondents in Washington, at the Pentagon, in Pennsylvania and in New York report and reflect on the day. If big news breaks, NPR will provide coverage as warranted. As always, NPR will update the program as needed for later feeds.

We Remember: StoryCorps Stories from 9/11
6 p.m. – 7 p.m.

Hosted by NPR’s Audie Cornish, in partnership with StoryCorps and the National September 11 Memorial & Museum, We Remember takes an intimate look at lives forever changed by the attacks on 9/11. These are stories from families and friends who tell us about their loved ones and their loss: the father who recalls the last words he shared with his son, the recovery worker who discovers a new meaning for normal, the fireman’s daughter who knew that her dad who perished in the line of duty wouldn’t have wanted it any other way. On the 10th anniversary of the attacks, host Audie Cornish checks in with StoryCorps families to find out how they make their way today.

The Sonic Memorial Project
7 p.m. – 8 p.m.

The Sonic Memorial Project commemorates the life and history of the World Trade Center and the people who passed through its doors. It was created with audio artifacts, rare recordings, and the input of thousands of people who called in with their personal stories. The Sonic Memorial Project was produced by the Kitchen Sisters, Davia Nelson and Nikki Silva.

A Concert for Hope
8 p.m. – 9 p.m.

NPR’s live, anchored coverage of the Washington National Cathedral’s A Concert for Hope. President Obama will speak during the concert, which features performances by Patti Labelle, Alan Jackson and Denyce Graves.

This American Life
9 p.m. – 10 p.m.

This American Life will revisit people who’ve been on the show previously, whose lives were significantly touched by the Sept 11th attacks. Included are: Lynn Simpson, who escaped the Twin Towers; Hyder Akbar, an Afghan-American teen whose father – a dry cleaner in the Bay Area – was tapped by Hamid Karzai to return to Afghanistan following the American invasion and become governor of the Kunar region; an American soldier who came home from Iraq and Afghanistan with severe PTSD, who now believes he’s won the battle with his demons; and more.

Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra
10 p.m. – 12 a.m.

On September 14, 2001, the “Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra” opened their season just 3 days after the tragic events of 9/11. The concert features Copland’s Fanfare for the Common Man; Beethoven’s Funeral March from the Symphony No. 3; and the finale from Tchaikovsky’s Symphony No. 6. Plus, it features a moving statement to the audience by then-Music Director Mariss Jansons.” opened their season just 3 days after the tragic events of 9/11. The concert features Copland’s Fanfare for the Common Man; Beethoven’s Funeral March from the Symphony No. 3; and the finale from Tchaikovsky’s Symphony No. 6. Plus, it features a moving statement to the audience by then-Music Director Mariss Jansons.





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